Mobile menu

Stron w wątku:   [1 2] >
Off topic: 6 hours consecutive interpreting
Autor wątku: Marjolein Snippe

Marjolein Snippe  Identity Verified
Holandia
Local time: 07:05
Członek ProZ.com
od 2012

angielski > niderlandzki
+ ...
Apr 14

A client has asked me to interpret for a non-English person who will be represented by an English lawyer at an English court session. The idea is to sit with the person throughout the session and quietly tell them what is being discussed.
I am not an interpreter and I do not translate legal texts (I specialise in medicine, life sciences etc.) so I was quick to reject this. I was just a bit surprised and am curious to hear if 1 consecutive interpreter for a 6 hour session is common - it sounds like a long stretch of uninterrupted concentration to me. What is normal in these cases? Pure curiosity from my side!

[Edited at 2017-04-14 07:55 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tom in London
Wielka Brytania
Local time: 06:05
Członek ProZ.com
od 2008

włoski > angielski
I used to do this Apr 14

I used to do worse than this: participating at meetings where I was **also** expected to do all the interpreting in both directions. There were about 8 people at some of those meetings, and many of them smoked throughout (this was Italy in the 1980s- 1990s). Then everyone would go to lunch and of course I was expected to continue intepreting, in both directions, all through lunch. Needless to say I didn't eat much. Then we all went back to the meeting.

It's a wonder I'm still alive.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

DZiW
Ukraina
angielski > rosyjski
+ ...
More than possible Apr 14

I was to escort a foreign businessman about the country and translate all the talkings and papers a whole day round--for a week, which was a bit hard at the start, but a few hours later I somehow switched to an 'automatic' translation mode--instantly translating almost without thinking (and remembering) from UA/RU to EN or vice-verse--no difference, even when it wasn't required) Why, sometimes I could read people and their feelings to predict the exact replies--letter for letter, including the tone.

Six hours? It's but a half of such a day, one of seven long days.
When one thinks about it, then it becomes even more difficult, till there comes a second wind.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Daryo
Wielka Brytania
Local time: 06:05
serbski > angielski
+ ...
it's certainly feasible Apr 15

but not as a long term daily average, unless you fancy giving yourself a one way ticket to an early burnout.

you don't want to put yourself too often in situations where as Tom in London put it "It's a wonder I'm still alive." -- and you want even less want to make clients or agencies consider that as "normal"!

what you can do once in a while in one day can be far more than a reasonable long term average.

I've done once for 13 hours what should be normally done by two teams of two for 6 hours and then another two teams of two for the next 6 hours - it took me about 2 days to recover and I got a number of days off for the trouble, but that's NOT a reference for what should be an acceptable or sustainable long term average.

When you have to do interpreting for weeks/months on, you quickly become aware of what is a sustainable daily average, just take a look at the AIIC (International Association of Conference Interpreters) site https://aiic.net what they are.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Lidija Klemencic
Serbia
Local time: 07:05
Członek ProZ.com
od 2016

angielski > serbski
+ ...
As Tom in London only worst Apr 15

I used to this for 6 years, in both directions, 8 to 12 hours a day. And, just to make things even worst, I was interpreting mainly at political meetings. One can only assume how much politicians can talk without saying anything until one has an unfortunate luck to be present at those meetings. What a load of b.s., you wouldn't believe it. They can talk and talk and talk...
As Tom in London said, I also sometimes wonder, how and why I am still alive.


worse, sorry

[Edited at 2017-04-15 12:21 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
FarkasAndras
Local time: 07:05
angielski > węgierski
+ ...
6 hours Apr 15

Marjolein Snippe wrote:

A client has asked me to interpret for a non-English person who will be represented by an English lawyer at an English court session. The idea is to sit with the person throughout the session and quietly tell them what is being discussed.
I am not an interpreter and I do not translate legal texts (I specialise in medicine, life sciences etc.) so I was quick to reject this. I was just a bit surprised and am curious to hear if 1 consecutive interpreter for a 6 hour session is common - it sounds like a long stretch of uninterrupted concentration to me. What is normal in these cases? Pure curiosity from my side!

[Edited at 2017-04-14 07:55 GMT]


That's not consecutive, that's chuchotage aka whispering interpreting... which is the most tiring type of interpreting job in my opinion.
6 hours is a little extreme but not unheard of. Personally, I would ask for a partner and do it in half-hour or 1-hour shifts. I could do 6 hours alone but I wouldn't want to... unless the pay was really good.
Normally I'm willing to interpret alone up to two hours straight. Any longer and I'd want a partner to switch back and forth with.

[Edited at 2017-04-15 18:20 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

liviu roth
USA
Local time: 01:05
rumuński > angielski
+ ...
In the US Apr 16

a court interpreter does that 8 hours/day, 5 days/week!
From my understanding, you were asked to do simultaneous interpreting (not consecutive, and not translation, as DZiW wrote) of a certain court proceeding. It is normal, and we, court interpreters do it on a daily basis.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Elmachich  Identity Verified
Maroko
Local time: 05:05
Członek ProZ.com
od 2014

angielski > francuski
+ ...
Great exercice! Everyday, all day long and non-stop in 3, not to say 4 directions... Apr 16

Tom in London wrote:

I used to do worse than this: participating at meetings where I was **also** expected to do all the interpreting in both directions. There were about 8 people at some of those meetings, and many of them smoked throughout (this was Italy in the 1980s- 1990s). Then everyone would go to lunch and of course I was expected to continue intepreting, in both directions, all through lunch. Needless to say I didn't eat much. Then we all went back to the meeting.

It's a wonder I'm still alive.



The only difference with Tom in London is that there was no 'smoking'... Not to say that it was just going crazy, speedy, etc. no time for eating, meetings were just coming one after the other and related to all possible issues. That is the business world in all its forms! However, we learn a lot about people, their behaviours, the complexity of (tricky) situations and we just find ourselves looking for those 'silent moments' one looks for so desperately. At the end of the day (if there is one!), you are just burnt out. Well, it's quite normal as you are going from ice to bubbling up and vice-versa, not to say having "Many crap days in a day!"


Direct link Reply with quote
 

liviu roth
USA
Local time: 01:05
rumuński > angielski
+ ...
With proper equipment Apr 17

FarkasAndras wrote:


That's not consecutive, that's chuchotage aka whispering interpreting... which is the most tiring type of interpreting job in my opinion.
6 hours is a little extreme but not unheard of. Personally, I would ask for a partner and do it in half-hour or 1-hour shifts. I could do 6 hours alone but I wouldn't want to... unless the pay was really good.
Normally I'm willing to interpret alone up to two hours straight. Any longer and I'd want a partner to switch back and forth with.

[Edited at 2017-04-15 18:20 GMT]


With proper equipment (most US courts have it) the interpreter interprets in simultaneous mode the consecutive dialogue between the attorney(s) and judge.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

David Lin  Identity Verified
Wielka Brytania
Local time: 06:05
Członek ProZ.com
od 2013

angielski > chiński
+ ...
whispering interpreting Apr 17

Yes, the OP's case is just whispering interpreting, not consecutive.

I had the experience to have to whisper to a client in an English court which was supposed to be a full-day hearing. Knowing it could be the most tiring job if you had to whisper every single deliberation of the judge and/or the solicitors, I asked that I would not do every word (just summarize) but make sure the client know roughly what was going on in the court room (for information). Otherwise I would need a 15-minute break after every 45 minutes to one hour of interpreting, because mine is only a human brain I would need a short break at regular intervals (which was not possible in a court hearing).

I also asked the solicitor for understanding in case something is missing due to long hours of whispering without break, and also asked the judge that there would be whispering interpreting during the hearing, every party involved should slow down their speed of speaking significantly or I couldn't catch up and might damage the accuracy.

All this was the conditions for my whispering job without breaks and were accepted at the pre-hearing interview with the solicitor. The solicitor explained that he just wanted his client to know in general what was going on in the hearing. Summarizing would be enough. The client was neither required to speak to the judge nor other solicitors.

Fortunately the hearing went on but finished shortly after the lunch break (yes, there was a lunch break) which I also had the opportunity to eat and rest my speaking tongue.

For the OP it was wise for you to decline the job because there would be plenty of legal (thus technical for you) terms to be used in a hearing. If you are not familiar with them, you would find it difficult to deliver.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Marjolein Snippe  Identity Verified
Holandia
Local time: 07:05
Członek ProZ.com
od 2012

angielski > niderlandzki
+ ...
NOWY TEMAT
Thank you! Apr 18

It is nice to read everyone's experiences with this - it sounds like this is not uncommon, although it is likely to be somewhat exhausting.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Tom in London
Wielka Brytania
Local time: 06:05
Członek ProZ.com
od 2008

włoski > angielski
Saliva Apr 18

Marjolein Snippe wrote:

It is nice to read everyone's experiences with this - it sounds like this is not uncommon, although it is likely to be somewhat exhausting.


My biggest problem was not having time to swallow. It was literally endless talking. Imagine a big table with about 8 people all taking part in the discussion (including me).

I ended up spraying saliva all over the place. There was nothing else I could do.

Take a box of tissues !

[Edited at 2017-04-18 09:29 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
Hiszpania
Local time: 07:05
Członek ProZ.com
hiszpański > angielski
+ ...
Interpreting everything Apr 18

Like Tom says, no escape even during the meals. Not just Pass the salt, would you?, either. Suddenly you have to translate the entire menu too, and you can imagine the tricky stuff that's in there. I think the rules about timeframes are only adhered to by official organisations, but the interpreter should be very sure they keep to the subject in hand as well.

Once I swotted up on servo-drives for one of those informal business-and-pleasure gigs at a spa near Barcelona, which was a kind of seminar of all the branches of the company which manufactured the drives, based in Switzerland. At the beginning the CEO stood up and welcomed everyone, and said the company strategy necessarily included a focus on the world outside, blah-blah, on other areas, other sectors, and that they had to keep an eye on companies totally unrelated to theirs. So, he said, first off we have a surprise guest who's here to give us a chat on his speciality which has nothing whatsoever to do with servo-drives - may I introduce Monsieur Something or Other from the Sorbonne, a renowned world expert on ... aircraft landing gear. Well, I knew the term in Spanish, but that was about all I knew. In an hour this bloke filled twenty or thirty whiteboards with diagrams and equations, and what he didn't know about landing gear you could have written on the back of a croissant. He smiled at me once or twice, knowing full well I wasn't getting any of it. I stopped my chuchotage to the Catalan engineers after five minutes. Why have you stopped? they asked. I gave them what I hoped was a withering look. Because I don't understand a word of the Big Surprise, I told them. Still, they gave me a written reference in the end, since I did fine with the old servo-drives.

[Edited at 2017-04-18 10:55 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
FarkasAndras
Local time: 07:05
angielski > węgierski
+ ...
Perhaps you might want to read the original post Apr 18

liviu roth wrote:

FarkasAndras wrote:


That's not consecutive, that's chuchotage aka whispering interpreting... which is the most tiring type of interpreting job in my opinion.
6 hours is a little extreme but not unheard of. Personally, I would ask for a partner and do it in half-hour or 1-hour shifts. I could do 6 hours alone but I wouldn't want to... unless the pay was really good.
Normally I'm willing to interpret alone up to two hours straight. Any longer and I'd want a partner to switch back and forth with.


With proper equipment (most US courts have it) the interpreter interprets in simultaneous mode the consecutive dialogue between the attorney(s) and judge.


That may well be the case but it has nothing to do with the discussion here:

Marjolein Snippe wrote:

A client has asked me to interpret for a non-English person who will be represented by an English lawyer at an English court session. The idea is to sit with the person throughout the session and quietly tell them what is being discussed.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Daryo
Wielka Brytania
Local time: 06:05
serbski > angielski
+ ...
8 hours/day, 5 days/week ... normal? Apr 20

liviu roth wrote:

a court interpreter does that 8 hours/day, 5 days/week!
From my understanding, you were asked to do simultaneous interpreting (not consecutive, and not translation, as DZiW wrote) of a certain court proceeding. It is normal, and we, court interpreters do it on a daily basis.


interpreting alone (be it consecutive / chuchotage / simultaneous ... whichever) 8 hours/day, 5 days/week ... 52 weeks per year... year in, year out = normal???

Is that some diehard Stakhanovite talking?

If that was coming from people who think that "interpreting is just talking" (IOW a variation on "translating is just glorified typing") I wouldn't be too surprised.

But as far as interpreters I know are concerned, not a single one would consider THAT as "normal" in a year of Sundays. Not to mention what the most serious association of conference interpreters in the world [https://aiic.net/] would have to say to that - most likely their private opinion would be simply unprintable.

[Edited at 2017-04-20 12:50 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Stron w wątku:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

6 hours consecutive interpreting

Advanced search


Translation news





SDL MultiTerm 2017
Guarantee a unified, consistent and high-quality translation with terminology software by the industry leaders.

SDL MultiTerm 2017 allows translators to create one central location to store and manage multilingual terminology, and with SDL MultiTerm Extract 2017 you can automatically create term lists from your existing documentation to save time.

More info »
Wordfast Pro
Translation Memory Software for Any Platform

Exclusive discount for ProZ.com users! Save over 13% when purchasing Wordfast Pro through ProZ.com. Wordfast is the world's #1 provider of platform-independent Translation Memory software. Consistently ranked the most user-friendly and highest value

More info »



All of ProZ.com
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Szukaj terminu
  • Praca