Italics for foreign names (universities, companies, schools, organisations...)
Autor wątku: Caroline Varella Gonsioroski

Caroline Varella Gonsioroski
Irlandia
Członek ProZ.com
od Feb 2021

angielski > portugalski
+ ...
Feb 25

Hi, guys

I hope I am typing this doubt on the right place.

I am translating a diploma from Portuguese into English and as usual I do not translate university and school names unless they are already translated on their website (so Wikipedia does not count).

In this case, should I put the university name in italics every time?

What are your views about this? Does everybody leaves institution and company names untranslated?

I just wa
... See more
Hi, guys

I hope I am typing this doubt on the right place.

I am translating a diploma from Portuguese into English and as usual I do not translate university and school names unless they are already translated on their website (so Wikipedia does not count).

In this case, should I put the university name in italics every time?

What are your views about this? Does everybody leaves institution and company names untranslated?

I just wanted to know how other Translators do in this case and what do they think about it.

Thank you!
Collapse


 

Tina Vonhof
Kanada
Local time: 11:52
Członek ProZ.com
od 2006

niderlandzki > angielski
+ ...
No italics Feb 25

I use italics only for the titles of published material: books, poems, magazines, and newspapers. Sometimes these may need a translation in parentheses.

Other foreign names get capitals in each word (other than 'and' or 'of'). There are no hard and fast rules for translating them. You can translate the word 'university' but not the name. Longer or more complex names, such as those of most organizations, may need translation but you can put the original name in arentheses after the
... See more
I use italics only for the titles of published material: books, poems, magazines, and newspapers. Sometimes these may need a translation in parentheses.

Other foreign names get capitals in each word (other than 'and' or 'of'). There are no hard and fast rules for translating them. You can translate the word 'university' but not the name. Longer or more complex names, such as those of most organizations, may need translation but you can put the original name in arentheses after the translation. An abbreviated name or acronym needs an explanation/translation in parentheses after it. Company names should be left as they are but if they consist of multiple words, they may also need an explanation/translation in parentheses.
Collapse


 

Caroline Varella Gonsioroski
Irlandia
Członek ProZ.com
od Feb 2021

angielski > portugalski
+ ...
NOWY TEMAT
. Feb 26

Thank you for you reply, Tina!

I guess there is no written rule for this. You say we can translate 'university' but not the name, although 'university' is part of the name. Such as 'Pontificia Universidade Catolica', which is not a very good example because this one has a translation, but you know what I mean? Or you translate the whole name or nothing at all.

As per the rest, I do the same


 

William Bowley
Wielka Brytania
Local time: 18:52
hiszpański > angielski
+ ...
Consistency Mar 2

As a rule, never translate company names. I can't think of a reason to. By translating the company name, you risk your translation no longer referring to the actual company but to some other entity (your 'creation').

This is not the same for institution names as clearly they commonly exist in other languages. No italics.

If the client has no specific style requirements, I agree with your point about translating all or nothing. Whatever you choose (leaving institution in
... See more
As a rule, never translate company names. I can't think of a reason to. By translating the company name, you risk your translation no longer referring to the actual company but to some other entity (your 'creation').

This is not the same for institution names as clearly they commonly exist in other languages. No italics.

If the client has no specific style requirements, I agree with your point about translating all or nothing. Whatever you choose (leaving institution in source language, source language with target translation in brackets, or direct translation into target language), it's important to be consistent.
Collapse


 

Anthony John Keily
Local time: 19:52
Członek ProZ.com
włoski > angielski
+ ...
No italics... Mar 2

...for institutional names. You're never wrong to use the native name of university, but you're right that often this is translated on websites.

Translating institutional names is a bit risky though. Just think of Dublin, which has UCD, TCD and DCU, which are respective University College Dublin, the University of Dublin (Trinity) and Dublin City University.


 


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:


You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Italics for foreign names (universities, companies, schools, organisations...)

Advanced search







MultiTerm
One central location to store and manage multilingual terminology.

By providing access to all those involved in applying terminology (such as engineers, marketers, translators, and terminologists), our terminology management solution ensures consistent and high-quality content from source through to translation.

More info »
Anycount & Translation Office 3000
Translation Office 3000

Translation Office 3000 is an advanced accounting tool for freelance translators and small agencies. TO3000 easily and seamlessly integrates with the business life of professional freelance translators.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Szukaj terminu
  • Praca
  • Forum
  • Multiple search